Umberto Pippolini’s ‘rediscovered’ Saint Francis

Saint Francis, alter Christus. Hearing about Umberto Pippolini’s research was really exciting, if only for the depth of his voice that ignites and becomes prophetic in tone. But why is the (re) discovery of Francis’ true face in his painting so important in a symbolic sense? Certainly the nature of the question, eminently metaphysical, which interprets the human need for transcendence –  is in this image an epiphany and a revelation of Christ himself, the mystery of life in his divinity. A view that satisfies an immediate desire: the existential need to embrace the Sacred, to have a direct perception of it, albeit mediated by art: “This image of Saint Francis is faithful to the Saint, for a more intrinsic reason than a simple hypothetical sum of somatic motifs; it is because it is both an image that you see and a reflection. Francis is reflected in the face of Christ, and from this derives his own face

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Antonio Massarutto, sculptor and designer

While the wire and kinetic sculptures of Alexander Calder and the works of Picasso have been stylistic influences, Antonio has a fascination for the animal world and the natural environment. He started his artistic career making abstract sculptures, but today his creatures include familiar beasts, such as wild boar and deer, dogs, and cattle, but also more exotic rhinoceros and crocodiles. His sculptures are often made of found and recycled materials, which led him to the concept of “land art”.  For these installations, Antonio finds a spot in the mountains or countryside and constructs a sculpture from the natural materials he finds on the site.

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Rosellina Avoscan: painter, sculptor and ceramist

Rosy’s art is particularly attuned to the twin themes of social justice and the plight of refugees fleeing from war-torn countries to find a new life.  Her goal is to communicate, educate and change perceptions through her art, and her works demonstrate this compassion and empathy.  Her mixed media work “Honorum” expresses just this, and is a personal way of honoring the lives of the many refugee children who have drowned in the Mediterranean Sea.

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Cortona, a star in the hills

Since this February, the Etruscan city has featured a new high-speed connection with the large cities of Northern Italy.  The “Frecciarossa” train allows one to move between Milan and our train station in three hours and this will make visiting the city’s splendors even easier and more comfortable. The health situation is still in a difficult moment, but the city administration, together with cultural and tourism operators, has prepared a program of events to be held with complete safety in mind.  There are also a series of packages that foresee the possibility to “find refuge” together with family members in one of the fine accommodation facilities in the area.  Cortona is a small center, with a big heart and with a vast and varied territory – from mountains to gentle hills, down to the valley where some of the most interesting gastronomic wonders of Tuscany are produced.  Already, starting this Spring, in accordance with actual health conditions, exhibitions will be prepared, and the first events of the season brought into being.  The idea of choosing Cortona for your “safe harbor” away from life in the big cities is beginning to gain ground as a lifestyle choice post-Covid 19.  Already a significant number of professional people have decided to spend a part of their time here, as they continue remote working.

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